Esterházy Palace

Opening times

Tuesday - Sunday and holidays from 10.00 am - 05.00 pm
Tuesday - Friday only with a guided tour

Opening times

Forchtenstein Castle

Opening times

Winter ticket with guided tour
Monday and Wednesday - Friday at 10.00 am and 01.00 pm
Saturday, Sunday and public holiday at 10.00 am, 01.00 pm and 03.00 pm

Opening times

Lackenbach Palace

Opening times

Thursday to Saturday and public holidays from 10.00 am - 03.00 pm

Opening times

St.Margarethen Quarry

Opening times

Winter break

Opening times

String Quartet II

Quartetto di Cremona

This sumptuous musical evening is composed of a rousing, youthful work framed by two expressive 'latecomers'. 'In the Beethoven cycle', wrote the classical music magazine Fono Forum, 'the Quartetto di Cremona prove themselves to be eminent ambassadors of the Italian quartet tradition and at the same time confirm their position as an ensemble of international excellence.' The internationally acclaimed chamber music ensemble, founded in 2000, returns at long last to Esterházy Palace - and, indeed, with music by Ludwig van Beethoven. The slow movement of the emotionally charged, poignant Opus 132 in A minor from his cycle of late quartets uses the famous 'Heiligen Dankgesang eines Genesenden an die Gottheit'. In a less existential, but no less important context, Maurice Ravel might also have had reason to thank heaven, namely when the 'Affaire Ravel' was finally over. After the jury of the 'Prix de Rome' had rejected his works for years, including his dazzling, dance-like String Quartet in F major, two of the conservative judges were forced to resign under public pressure - leaving the young composer standing there without a prize, but still as the winner. Serenity begins the evening: not one note in Joseph Haydn's Quartet op. 77/1 suggests that it would prove to be one of his last works in this genre. Humour, melancholy, and depth of feeling yet again form a delightful union.

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