Esterházy Palace

Opening times

Tuesday - Sunday and holidays from 10.00 am - 05.00 pm
Tuesday - Friday only with a guided tour

Opening times

Forchtenstein Castle

Opening times

Winter ticket with guided tour
Monday and Wednesday - Friday at 10.00 am and 01.00 pm
Saturday, Sunday and public holiday at 10.00 am, 01.00 pm and 03.00 pm

Opening times

Lackenbach Palace

Opening times

Thursday to Saturday and public holidays from 10.00 am - 03.00 pm

Opening times

St.Margarethen Quarry

Opening times

Winter break

Opening times

Concert to start the year

Emöke Baráth, soprano


Ádám Fischer, conductor


Danish Chamber Orchestra

'… and because I do not have a single symphony with me, I am writing a new one at breakneck speed,' reported Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in 1783 to his father from Linz, where he had only days to prepare a concert. Despite the haste in which it was written, the 'Linzer' represents one of Mozart's greatest creations: here, for the first time, Mozart follows Haydn's model and prefaces a symphony with a slow introduction. The movements that follow justify this feudal entryway in scope and content. He thus opens a new - and last - chapter in his preoccupation with the genre. Joseph Haydn's final symphonic chapter would begin eight years later, in the year of Mozart's death. With his twelve 'Londoners' (1791-95), he takes the classical symphony to what is, strictly speaking, its final summit. The especially popular No. 94, which in German bears the epithet 'Mit dem Paukenschlag' ('With the timpani strike'; in English known as the 'Surprise'), is dotted with many more surprises than the one great shock effect might suggest, a moment that an educated audience anticipates with pleasurable delight.

Ádám Fischer and his Danish Chamber Orchestra, a combination celebrated not only in the classical repertoire, are the perfect interpreters for this uplifting musical start of the year under the banner of the Haydn-Mozart friendship. The pair's two greatest concert arias, sung by the the golden-toned Emöke Baráth, form a bridge from the symphonic to the vocal.

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